*Notice of Nondiscrimination*

EPAS scores released for Madison County Schools

Madison County Schools released the results of the EXPLORE and PLAN tests taken by students in grades 8 and 10, respectively, during the fall of 2012. 

 
In 2012, 827 8th grade Madison County students in the district’s five middle schools took the EXPLORE assessment. The scoring scale for the assessment is from 1 to 25. 
 
EXPLORE Scores from Fall 2012 Administration

SUBJECT
DISTRICT
AVERAGE
STATE
AVERAGE
District Above State Average
 
2007
2012
Gain
2007
2012
Gain
2012
English
13.7
14.8
1.1
13.7
14.3
0.6
0.5
Mathematics
14.2
15.6
1.4
14.4
15.3
0.9
0.3
Reading
13.7
14.9
1.2
13.7
14.4
0.7
0.5
Science
15.7
17.0
1.3
15.8
16.3
0.5
0.7
Composite
14.4
15.7
1.3
14.5
15.2
0.7
0.5

 











·         All middle schools have made significant gains in all tested areas during the past 5 years.
·         In 2007, the district middle school average was at or below state average in all tested areas. In 2012, the district middle school average is above state average in all tested areas.

In 2012, 755 10th grade Madison County students in the district’s two high schools took the PLAN assessment. The scoring scale for the assessment is from 1 to 32.
 
PLAN Scores from Fall 2012 Administration

SUBJECT
DISTRICT
AVERAGE
STATE
AVERAGE
District Above State Average
 
2007
2012
Gain
2007
2012
Gain
2012
English
15.7
17.0
1.3
15.3
16.1
0.8
0.9
Mathematics
16.3
17.1
0.8
16.2
16.8
0.6
0.3
Reading
16.5
17.4
0.9
16.1
16.6
0.5
0.8
Science
17.3
18.3
1.0
17.3
17.9
0.6
0.4
Composite
16.6
17.5
0.9
16.3
17.0
0.7
0.5

 
 










·         Our high schools have shown steady gains in all tested areas over the past 5 years.
·         Our high schools are above state average in English, Reading, Science, and Composite and are slightly behind the state average in Mathematics.

We are very proud of the success our middle and high school students have made over the past several years. It is evident that district and school initiatives are working to prepare students for college and career readiness. More importantly, without the hard work of teachers and administrators in each of our middle and high schools, these gains would not be possible,” said Randy Peffer, Chief Academic Officer.
 
Administration of the EXPLORE, PLAN, and ACT assessments, which are provided by ACT, Inc., was mandated by Senate Bill 130 in the 2006 session of the Kentucky General Assembly. The assessments – known as EPAS – help schools focus on meeting academic standards across the entire secondary school program. Scores from the assessments will be helpful in measuring student achievement, gauging their readiness for transition and evaluating school programs.
 
“Madison County Schools continually monitors individual student progress,” Superintendent Tommy Floyd said. “Having this kind of data confirms that we are certainly moving in the right direction and that our students are receiving the kind of instruction they need for individual success.”
 
EXPLORE is a high school readiness examination designed to help 8th graders explore a broad range of options for their future. The exam assesses four subjects (English, mathematics, reading, and science) and provides needs assessments and other components to help students plan for high school and beyond. PLAN helps 10th graders build a solid foundation for future academic and career success and provides information needed to address school districts’ high-priority issues. The exam assesses the same four subjects and is a predictor of success on the ACT. Both assessments help schools pinpoint areas of weakness for individual students and school-wide curriculum and make changes to improve learning. 
 

Senate Bill 1, passed in 2009 by the Kentucky General Assembly, requires a high school readiness examination in the 8th grade and a college readiness examination in 10th grade. EXPLORE and PLAN, respectively, will be used for these purposes. Additionally, Readiness for College and Career is a factor for middle and high schools in the new accountability system, referred to as Unbridled Learning.



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